Categories
food

ALINEA SPRING TASTING MENU

MENU:

Blis Char Roe:
Cantaloupe Melon • Champagne • Lime

Chilled Carrot Soup:
Cardamon • Pineapple • Coconut

Poached Atlantic Scallops:
Vermouth • English Peas • Smoked Ham • Spring Floral Aroma

Prime Beef Short Rib:
Granny Smith Apple • Horseradish • Celery

Sweet Garlic Corn Orzo:
Spring Onions • Lemon • Mascarpone

Roasted Mushrooms:
Zucchini • Pistachios • Extra Virgin Olive Oil Herb Vinaigrette

Dark Chocolate On Your Table:
Tropical Fruits • Peanuts • Vanilla


PICTURES:

VIDEOS:

Categories
Dante

Dante’s Inferno: Canto 14; CIRCLE SEVEN: Round Three The Violent Against God, Nature, and Art

Writing title: Dante’s Inferno
Canto: Canto 14; CIRCLE SEVEN: Round Three The Violent Against God, Nature, and Art

Artwork: Salvador Dali

Canto 14 summary:

Dante, in pity, restores the torn leaves to the soul of his countryman and the Poets move on to the next round, a great PLAIN OF BURNING SAND upon which there descends an eternal slow RAIN OF FIRE. Here, scorched by fire from above and below, are three classes of sinners suffering differing degrees of exposure to the fire. The BLASPHEMERS (The Violent against God) are stretched supine upon the sand, the SODOMITES (The Violent against Nature) run in endless circles, and the USURERS (The Violent against Art, which is the Grandchild of God) huddle on the sands. The Poets find CAPANEUS stretched out on the sands, the chief sinner of that place. He is still blaspheming God. They continue along the edge of the Wood of the Suicides and come to a blood-red rill which flows boiling from the Wood and crosses the burning plain. Virgil explains the miraculous power of its waters and discourses on the OLD MAN OF CRETE and the origin of all the rivers of Hell. The symbolism of the burning plain is obviously centered in sterility (the desert image) and wrath (the fire image). Blasphemy, sodomy, and usury are all unnatural and sterile actions: thus the unbearing desert is the eternity of these sinners; and thus the rain, which in nature should be fertile and cool, descends as fire. Capaneus, moreover, is subjected not only to the wrath of nature (the sands below) and the wrath of God (the fire from above), but is tortured most by his own inner violence, which is the root of blasphemy.


Categories
Dante

Dante’s Inferno: Canto 13; CIRCLE SEVEN: Round Two The Violent Against Themselves

Writing title: Dante’s Inferno
Canto: Canto 13; CIRCLE SEVEN: Round Two The Violent Against Themselves

Artwork: Salvador Dali

Canto 13 summary:

Nessus carries the Poets across the river of boiling blood and leaves them in the Second Round of the Seventh Circle, THE WOOD OF THE SUICIDES. Here are punished those who destroyed their own lives and those who destroyed their substance. The souls of the Suicides are encased in thorny trees whose leaves are eaten by the odious HARPIES, the overseers of these damned. When the Harpies feed upon them, damaging their leaves and limbs, the wound bleeds. Only as long as the blood flows are the souls of the trees able to speak. Thus, they who destroyed their own bodies are denied a human form; and just as the supreme expression of their lives was self-destruction, so they are permitted to speak only through that which tears and destroys them. Only through their own blood do they find voice. And to add one more dimension to the symbolism, it is the Harpies—defilers of all they touch—who give them their eternally recurring wounds. The Poets pause before one tree and speak with the soul of PIER DELLE VIGNE. In the same wood they see JACOMO DA SANT’ANDREA, and LANO DA SIENA, two famous SQUANDERERS and DESTROYERS OF GOODS pursued by a pack of savage hounds. The hounds overtake SANT ANDREA, tear him to pieces and go off carrying his limbs in their teeth, a self-evident symbolic retribution for the violence with which these sinners destroyed their substance in the world. After this scene of horror, Dante speaks to an UNKNOWN FLORENTINE SUICIDE whose soul is inside the bush which was torn by the hound pack when it leaped upon Sant’Andrea.


Categories
Dante

Dante’s Inferno: Canto 12; CIRCLE SEVEN; Round One The Violent Against Neighbors

Writing title: Dante’s Inferno
Canto: Canto 12; CIRCLE SEVEN; Round One The Violent Against Neighbors

Artwork: Salvador Dali

Canto 12 summary:

The Poets begin the descent of the fallen rock wall, having first to evade the MINOTAUR, who menaces them. Virgil tricks him and the Poets hurry by. Below them they see the RIVER OF BLOOD, which marks the First Round of the Seventh Circle as detailed in the previous Canto. Here are punished the VIOLENT AGAINST THEIR NEIGHBORS, great war-makers, cruel tyrants, highwaymen—all who shed the blood of their fellowmen. As they wallowed in blood during their lives, so they are immersed in the boiling blood forever, each according to the degree of his guilt, while fierce Centaurs patrol the banks, ready to shoot with their arrows any sinner who raises himself out of the boiling blood beyond the limits permitted him. ALEXANDER THE GREAT is here, up to his lashes in the blood, and with him ATTILA, THE SCOURGE OF GOD. They are immersed in the deepest part of the river, which grows shallower as it circles to the other side of the ledge, then deepens again. The Poets are challenged by the Centaurs, but Virgil wins a safe conduct from CHIRON, their chief, who assigns NESSUS to guide them and to bear them across the shallows of the boiling blood. Nessus carries them across at the point where it is only ankle deep and immediately leaves them and returns to his patrol.


Categories
Wines

Oddero Barolo 2011


Country: Italy

Region: Barolo, Piedmont

Grape varieties: Nebbiolo

Degree of alcohol: 14.5%

My review:

Beautiful and magenta color. Super flourish. Legs off glass is great and fluid for 14.5%

Deep currant and anise scented, off the inhale you have incredible almost menthol scented backdrop. One sniff of this glass really hits deep and fills your body with its flavor .

Medium body. Spicy and incredibly dry. The grape varietal is amazing and well balanced , juicy , dry , but incredible tannin profile completes this wine .

One truly exquisite wine.

My rating: 97/100


Wine.com:

Winemaker Notes

#62 Wine Spectator Top 100 of 2015

Brilliant garnet-red color, with warmer tinges developing over time. Unmistakable bouquet, very pleasant, intense yet ethereal, very persistent, at times spiced, with aromas of truffles, licorice and dried flowers. Dry taste, with important, full tannins.

Wine Spectator: 93/100.

This red is tightly wound, binding the cherry, strawberry, licorice and mentholated herb flavors with fine-grained tannins and lively acidity. All the elements are there, but this needs time to find equilibrium. Fine length. Best from 2018 through 2030.


Categories
Wines

Enrico Serafino; Cantina Maestra Alta Langa Zero 2010


Country: Italy

Region: Alta Langa, Piedmont

Grape varieties: Pinot Nero, Chardonnay

Degree of alcohol: 12.5%

My review: Color is very clear and and crisp. Legs are decent rolling off sides. Smells of apple and pear, very lively and zesty. This wine is incredible and packs a punch of flavor. The bubbles incorporated with this wine is outstanding. A perfect champagne to start your meal.

My rating: 95/100


Winemag.com: 93/100

“A blend of 85% Pinot Nero and 15% Chardonnay, this vibrant sparkler delivers creamy apple, ripe pear, pastry and tangerine zest while a hazelnut note accents the finish. Fresh acidity brightens the palate alongside small continuous bubbles that lend elegance. It’s loaded with finesse and flavor.” – KERIN O’KEEFE


Categories
Dante

Dante’s Inferno: Canto 11; CIRCLE SIX; The Heretics

Writing title: Dante’s Inferno
Canto: Canto 11; CIRCLE SIX; The Heretics

Artwork: Salvador Dali; On the Edge of the Seventh Circle

Canto 10 summary:
The Poets reach the inner edge of the SIXTH CIRCLE and find a great jumble of rocks that had once been a cliff, but which has fallen into rubble as the result of the great earthquake that shook Hell when Christ died. Below them lies the SEVENTH CIRCLE, and so fetid is the air that arises from it that the Poets cower for shelter behind a great tomb until their breaths can grow accustomed to the stench. Dante finds an inscription on the lid of the tomb labeling it as the place in Hell of POPE ANASTASIUS. Virgil takes advantage of the delay to outline in detail THE DIVISION OF THE LOWER HELL, a theological discourse based on The Ethics and The Physics of Aristotle with subsequent medieval interpretations. Virgil explains also why it is that the Incontinent are not punished within the walls of Dis, and rather ingeniously sets forth the reasons why Usury is an act of Violence against Art, which is the child of Nature and hence the Grandchild of God. (By “Art,”Dante means the arts and crafts by which man draws from nature, i.e., Industry.) As he concludes he rises and urges Dante on. By means known only to Virgil, he is aware of the motion of the stars and from them he sees that it is about two hours before Sunrise of Holy Saturday.

Categories
Wines

Domaine Chante Cigale; Châteauneuf-Du-Pape 2016


Country: France

Region: Vallée du Rhône, Rhône méridional

Designation of origin: Châteauneuf-du-Pape

Grape varieties: Grenache 65 %, Syrah 20 %, Mourvèdre 10 %, Cinsault 5 %

Degree of alcohol: 15 %

My review: Deep purple color with strong legs hanging on the sides of the glass. Very beautiful color and visual complexity. Initial hints off the nose are deep rooted pungent black berry notes , long lasting in the nasal cavities of spice, oak and tobacco aromatics. Taste is tremendous and incredibly balanced. Upfront mixture of spiciness and tart that blend into well rounded flavor of lasting pepper and tannin. Medium body wine that is surprising for the flavor complexities.

My rating: 92/100

SAQ.com: Robert M. Parker Jr: 91/100


Categories
Dante

Dante’s Inferno: Canto 10; CIRCLE SIX; The Heretics

Writing title: Dante’s Inferno
Canto: Canto 10; CIRCLE SIX; The Heretics

Artwork: Salvador Dali

Canto 10 summary:
As the Poets pass on, one of the damned hears Dante speaking, recognizes him as a Tuscan, and calls to him from one of the fiery tombs. A moment later he appears. He is FARINATA DEGLI UBERTI, a great war-chief of the Tuscan Ghibellines. The majesty and power of his bearing seem to diminish Hell itself. He asks Dante’s lineage and recognizes him as an enemy. They begin to talk politics, but are interrupted by another shade, who rises from the same tomb. This one is CAVALCANTE DEI CAVALCANTI, father of Guido Cavalcanti, a contemporary poet. If it is genius that leads Dante on his great journey, the shade asks, why is Guido not with him? Can Dante presume to a greater genius than Guido’s? Dante replies that he comes this way only with the aid of powers Guido has not sought. His reply is a classic example of many-leveled symbolism as well as an overt criticism of a rival Poet. The senior Cavalcanti mistakenly infers from Dante’s reply that Guido is dead, and swoons back into the flames. Farinata, who has not deigned to notice his fellow-sinner, continues from the exact point at which he had been interrupted. It is as if he refuses to recognize the flames in which he is shrouded. He proceeds to prophesy Dante’s banishment from Florence, he defends his part in Florentine politics, and then, in answer to Dante’s question, he explains how it is that the damned can foresee the future but have no knowledge of the present. He then names others who share his tomb, and Dante takes his leave with considerable respect for his great enemy, pausing only long enough to leave word for Cavalcanti that Guido is still alive.

Categories
Dante

Dante’s Inferno: Canto 9; CIRCLE SIX; The Heretics

Writing title: Dante’s Inferno
Canto: Canto 9; CIRCLE SIX; The Heretics

Artwork: Salvador Dali

Canto 9 summary:
At the Gate of Dis the Poets wait in dread. Virgil tries to hide his anxiety from Dante, but both realize that without Divine Aid they will surely be lost. To add to their terrors THREE INFERNAL FURIES, symbols of Eternal Remorse, appear on a near-by tower, from which they threaten the Poets and call for MEDUSA to come and change them to stone. Virgil at once commands Dante to turn and shut his eyes. To make doubly sure, Virgil himself places his hands over Dante’s eyes, for there is an Evil upon which man must not look if he is to be saved. But at the moment of greatest anxiety a storm shakes the dirty air of Hell and the sinners in the marsh begin to scatter like frightened Frogs. THE HEAVENLY MESSENGER is approaching. He appears walking majestically through Hell, looking neither to right nor to left. With a touch he throws open the Gate of Dis while his words scatter the Rebellious Angels. Then he returns as he came. The Poets now enter the gate unopposed and find themselves in the Sixth Circle. Here they find a countryside like a vast cemetery. Tombs of every size stretch out before them, each with its lid lying beside it, and each wrapped in flames. Cries of anguish sound endlessly from the entombed dead. This is the torment of the HERETICS of every cult. By Heretic, Dante means specifically those who did violence to God by denying immortality. Since they taught that the soul dies with the body, so their punishment is an eternal grave in the fiery morgue of God’s wrath.